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Creative Commons and OER

Tue, July 01, 2014 9:02 AM | Ranelle Maltas (Administrator)

OER or Open Educational Resources are a great thing. Not every organization has the money or the resources to create or purchase all the training they need. Reusing OER can save you time and money. But you must understand that Free is not the same as Open.

 

OER are teaching, learning, and research materials in any medium that reside in the public domain or have been released under an open license that permits their free use and re-purposing by others.*

 

CreativeCommons.org is a nonprofit organization that provides free copyright licenses. Let's break down what types of licenses there are and what each one means.

 

The Conditions:

Attribution (BY)

Others may distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon your work, even commercially, as long as they credit you for the original creation.

ShareAlike (SA)

All new works based on yours must also carry the Share Alike condition as well as keep any other conditions you set.

NonCommercial (NC)

Cannot be used for commercial use.

No Derivatives (ND)

Allows for redistributions as long as it is passed along unchanged and in whole.

 

The Licenses:


Attribution

CC BY

This license lets others distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon your work, even commercially, as long as they credit you for the original creation. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.




Attribution ShareAlike

CC BY-SA

This license lets others distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon your work, even commercially, as long as they credit you for the original creation. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.




Attribution No Derivatives

CC BY-ND

This license lets others distribute, remix, tweak, and build upon your work, even commercially, as long as they credit you for the original creation. This is the most accommodating of licenses offered. Recommended for maximum dissemination and use of licensed materials.




Attribution-NonCommercial

CC BY-NC

This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, and although their new works must also acknowledge you and be non-commercial, they don’t have to license their derivative works on the same terms.




Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike

CC BY-NC-SA

This license lets others remix, tweak, and build upon your work non-commercially, as long as they credit you and license their new creations under the identical terms.




Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs

CC BY-NC-ND

This license is the most restrictive of our six main licenses, only allowing others to download your works and share them with others as long as they credit you, but they can’t change them in any way or use them commercially.

 

Whenever you use material licensed by the Creative Commons, you must give the correct attribution (see http://wiki.creativecommons.org/Best_practices_for_attribution). There are four parts:

  1. Title
  2. Author
  3. Source (where did it come from)
  4. License (i.e. CC BY John Doe)

 

So now that you know what OER and the Creative Commons license is and you know how to attribute the material, here are some great places you can find OER:

 

To learn more about Open Education, read the declaration at http://www.capetowndeclaration.org/read-the-declaration.

 

*Dr. Cable Green, director of Global Learning with Creative Commons.
  

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